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Movie Reviews

Honesty and expectation run hand in hand with my movie reviews. There are right and wrong ways to gauge films, and my way is to find out what the movie is trying to provide me with. Going into an action film needs to be met with guilty pleasure enjoyment. Dramas require a deeper train of thought. Comedies are medicine for the soul, especially when they are done right. My main idea is digging deeper. I want to know what this director is trying to tell me or if he/she simply wants me to relax and "get away". Movies are escape into a world only meant for imagination and mad creativity. We are all critics when it comes to film and our reactions/thoughts shape the future landscape of Hollywood and their productions. Honesty is the biggest requirement in movie critiques, but knowing what to expect is the secret ingredient. -Dan Buffa

Coming 20 years after the 1996 original, a fact that the new film reminds you of at least a couple dozen times, Independence Day: Resurgence is a ridiculous, Will Smith-less sequel that tries to capture the magic of a long forgotten spectacle.

The juxtaposition between Hart's mild mannered, often cowardly Calvin and Johnson's delightfully oblivious and ever-optimistic Agent Stone produces much of the movie's humor. 

Although the film is live-action, one cannot help but feel like they're watching a computer animation.  There are lots of colors and interesting character design, but even the human actors seem to be placed in front of a green screen at all times, taking away any authenticity.

The best part of The Conjuring 2, indeed the likely reason for its existence, is the return of Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson as Lorraine and Ed Warren.

Samberg is hilarious and pitch perfect as the delusional man-child Conner4Real.  While his antics range from asinine and stupid to outright dangerous, nothing he does seems too far outside the range of possibility in today's celebrity landscape, a notion that's underscored by an on-the-nose recurring TMZ-like program that consistently rips Conner.

The scenes following Apocalypse, looking like a shriveled blue bratwurst, are the film's weakest.  As the supervillain (played by Oscar Isaac for some reason, whose talents are completely wasted here) goes around collecting his “Four Horseman” by rounding up disaffected mutants, he spits out cringeworthy lines about the doom and gloom of humanity and how he's a God to be worshiped.

The girls cause even more problems for Mac and Kelly than the frat did, and they end up teaming up with former foe Teddy Sanders (Zac Efron) to try and run the new sorority out of their house.

When it comes to The Nice Guys the team of Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosselin stick to the characters that you would expect them to be, and in The Nice Guys it works.

The Darkness highlights everything that is currently wrong with mainstream horror while offering little in the way of tension or terror.

Wrapping up the Captain America trilogy in spectacular fashion, Captain America: Civil War marks the strongest ensemble film yet in the Marvel Cinematic Universe while also emphasizing the consequences a team of unchecked superhumans can cause after the events of the previous Marvel films. 

Like the slew of Saturday Night Live movies that have been produced, Keanu suffers from a concept that makes a good sketch on television but is hard to mine an engaging 98-minute film from. 

As with the other Barbershop films, the movie features a loose plot while focusing on the inhabitants of Calvin's shop riffing and debating issues ranging from girls on Instagram to infidelity to how President Obama likes his hair. 

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